Looking For Some Advice From Non-U.S. Readers of eBooks

You’d have to be living under a rock not to realize that ebook market growth is skyrocketing across the globe. I think that’s a good thing for readers everywhere, and it’s also a great potential opportunity for authors like myself. Of course, the trick is to know what ebook formats/devices and retailers people are using, along with a couple other tidbits of information. That’s where I’m hoping that you, my friend, can lend me a hand.

Now, I’m going to set aside the language and translation issue for the moment, as that’s a much bigger issue. What I’d like to ask is that if you live outside the United States and read books in English (either as a primary or secondary language), please leave me a comment here with a bit of info:

  • The country you’re living in
  • Your favorite ebook retail site(s)
  • How you typically discover books you’d like to read
  • The typical price (or range of prices) in your currency of the books you buy
  • Any other comments you might care to make on the topic (and suggestions are definitely welcome!)

Depending on the number of responses, I’ll consolidate the results in a follow-on post.

Many thanks in advance should you decide to help me out with this!

P.S. Please feel free to forward this on to any friends you know who might like to add their input.

151 thoughts on “Looking For Some Advice From Non-U.S. Readers of eBooks

  1. Mark L. Sheppard

    I’m in Canada. I also have a playbook with a number of ebook readers on it (Kobo, OverDrive, Kindle). Most of my books come from Smashwords, but when buy books, it’s an equal split between Amazon and Kobo (through Chapters.ca). I really have to want a book to pay more than $5.00 for it. I agree with the earlier comments about the artificially inflated prices for books distributed through the big houses versus those provided directly by independent authors. Strangely enough, if I had the choice, I’d prefer to pay more for an early edition hardcover of a favourite mainstream author than pay $15-$18 for the ebook edition.

    Reply
  2. Xdeo

    From the UK and would normally obtain e-books from Amazon.

    Howver, as well as Amozon discussion pages, i use a large number of sites e.g. Books on the Knob (US based http://blog.booksontheknob.org/); smashwords; e-reader IQ0 etc) for details of free ebooks. Would rarely spend more than £4.99 on fiction (because so much under this incl free). Principle read is non-fiction so would spend considerable more. BUT kindle rubbish for much illustrated/visual mediums which limits their appeal as an e-book.

    Wouldn’r be without kindle but must accept but it is poor reference purposes. Too difficult to refing previous pages..

    Reply
  3. Edwin

    Hi,
    I am from the Netherlands and use the Kindle app on multiple devices.
    Usually discover new writers via the recommendations in the kindle e-book shop, but have a habit to give writers that discover me on twitter a try as well :-)
    Since prices vary a lot there is not much I can say, although I tend to try to keep my purchases below the 15$ per book.

    But most importantly, still very happy to discover you as a writer. Keep it up!

    Reply
  4. Jessica

    I live in Canada.
    I read on my iPad/iPhone. I have bought ebooks through iBooks, kindle, & kobo. I tend to buy from Amazon because it’s easy and if they don’t have the book I want for Kindle there’s a pretty good chance it isn’t available in that format. The only one I don’t like is Kobo though … I don’t like the format and I can’t easily cite those ebooks.
    I guess my average purchase would be between $8-$10 but I have paid as much as $20 or so (usually for non-fiction though). The price doesn’t matter so much to me these days unless there is also a hard copy of the book and it is cheaper than the ebook.
    I have a number of authors I follow but I tend to hear about new authors/books through twitter, amazon recommendations, occasionally through blogs, and GoodReads. I will also just browse Amazon from time to time … Pretty close to browsing an actual store for me with the added benefit of being able to purchase the first book in a series.

    Reply
  5. wendy

    I’m from the UK. i get my ebooks from Amazon as I have a Kindle. don’t like to pay more than £5 for them. I generally go for authors I know or lately from indi authors on Twitte. hope this helps

    Reply
  6. Pauline Graham (@PaulineAGraham)

    I live in Scotland in the UK and use a Kindle app on a few devices.
    I generally buy books from Amazon. I’ve got so many from Amazon I haven’t really bothered to look anywhere else.
    Recommendations are always followed up, from Twitter, FB, friends, family, TV, etc, and I always follow my favourite authors. Sometimes I buy a book because it has a lovely cover – daft but true.
    £2 – 10 is what I typically spend but also obviously cruise the ‘free ebooks’ section quite often.
    Hope that’s some help and all the best!

    Reply
  7. Michal

    I live in England, UK

    Ever since I bought my Kindle touch, I have been using the amazon store ever since. I’d rather a HUGE library of digital book (lots of them free, mind you) with a nice discount instead of a paperback. Personally, this is the easiest way to keep track of my favourite authors, as millions of books (a slight exaggeration there) are nothing but a touch or two away.

    Reply
  8. Karen Pillay

    Australia. Usually books from IBooks as the buying process doesn’t involve credit card, just load up a pre purchased itunes card. It also allows me to put books into collections which I do for each writer. Bookmarking is easy and not fiddly.
    Cost varies from free (usually firsts in a series) up to about 8 or 9 AUD. Our dollar sits at about $1.03 US at the moment. I pre purchase in advance when possible as price is cheaper. Eg new release Dean Koontz was 7.99 instead of 12.99 . Hope that helps. Oh new authors- I used to browse the stacks of books and read covers to decide to read a book, if I liked it I would go back for more. I still do that sometimes, but now twitter and digitally searching catalogues for interesting books. But once I find good authors, I tend to stick with them, read all their books and look for more.

    Reply
  9. Horace

    Guernsey
    Amazon
    Free book lists and tweets. Reader reviews Amazon
    Free to £10
    I like series of books that I can read back to back. I like big books

    Reply
  10. Lyn

    I live in England and use a kindle so use Amazon.co.uk to purchase a large majority of my ebooks. Amazon.com doesn’t work for ebooks.
    I have a few favourite authors who’s work I keep a look out for. I also receive email notifications from Amazon suggesting titles based on previous purchases, or recommendations from online (usually twitter).
    As for price, of course free is my favourite price but I will spend up to £10 if its a book I really really want and of course pre-ordering can save money too. My average spend though is between 79p and £4.00
    I like that I can try book samples and often buy other books in a series having got hooked on the first one.
    Hope this is what you needed.

    Reply

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